1. Rig Source, Inc. Welcomes Tom LeDonne to Team

    October 20, 2020

    Tom LeDonne

    Company: Rig Source, Inc.

    Contact: Monica Coenen

    Phone: 630-365-1649

    E-mail: monica@rigsourceinc.com

     

    For Immediate Release

    Rig Source, Inc. Welcomes Tom LeDonne to Team

    Elburn, IL Rig Source, Inc., a leading drill rig supplier, adds Tom LeDonne, an industry veteran, to their team of experts. Tom will be focused on supporting the geotechnical drilling market in the Midwest. 

    Having earned his degree in civil engineering with an emphasis in Geotechnical, LeDonne began an exciting career in the fields of and related to Subsurface exploration, design, and Equipment sales. He’s since acquired over five decades of experience in the industry; earning outstanding accolades for his work in the field as well as his mentorship in leadership positions such as President at Diedrich Drill. His longevity in the industry attests to the fact that he is a wealth of knowledge.

    LeDonne is passionate about the geotechnical field and enjoys the challenges associated with each individual task. “Every boring is unique making this line of work unpredictable. To succeed, it involves sound judgement and the right equipment,” explains LeDonne. “I’m excited for the opportunity to work with Rig Source where I can support drillers by sharing my knowledge and use my drilling expertise to fit them with the proper equipment to get the job done.”

    Based in LaPorte, Indiana, LeDonne will focus on new and used drill rig and tooling sales, primarily visiting customers in the Midwest. LeDonne will remain available to assist all Rig Source clients, at any time, when his expertise is needed, and is eager to stay connected and continue serving his longtime customers. “We are proud to welcome Tom to our team as one of the most respected Geotech sales support people in the country” states Mike Crimaldi, President at Rig Source, Inc. “I’ve been working with Tom in the drilling industry for over 30 years and his professionalism and character can’t be beat.”

    Rig Source, Inc., based in Elburn, IL, is a drill rig supplier providing new and used drill rig sales, rentals, service and support to the Geotechnical and Environmental drilling industries. We stock and maintain an assortment of drills from top manufacturers to meet a variety of needs and budgets while delivering an unprecedented degree of customer service. To learn more, please visit www.rigsourceinc.com or call 630-365-1649.

    -end-



  2. Career Development in the Oil and Coal Drilling Industries

    March 9, 2015
    Your Future in Drilling: Career Development Tracks in the Mining Industries

     

    If you’re considering a career in the coal mining, oil, or gas industries, you might not have a clear picture of how your career will progress. Your education, goals, and salary desires can all affect what path you might take in your mining industries career. Let’s drill down into what arcs your career path might make.

    Possible career paths for workers in the oil and coal drilling industries.

     

    First of all, it’s important to note that all entry level positions in the mining industries are paid hourly, meaning that the estimated salaries in this infographic are conservative, given that many in the industry work more than a 40-hour week. Jesse Whittaker, a Sales Rep at Rig Source who grew up in West Virginia and has been working in coal mining since the age of 16, knows the reason behind this: unpredictability.

    “There is no standard day on a drill rig,” says Jesse. “You could work 8 hours in a day and everything would be fine, or you could have an issue in the hole and be there for 18 hours.”

    Most high school graduates will begin as a miner or laborer, earning from $37,000-45,000/year for operating heavy mining machinery, drill blasting holes, transporting coal, and laying out and building underground mines, according to Indeed. Most miners fall between the ages of 20-45, according to WiseGeek; with that in mind, working in the drilling industry may be ideal for a young person without a family at home, since the job requires so much time away from the family.

    Miners or laborers can advance to an equipment operator miner, whose job duties include safely and efficiently operating mining equipment. The top rung of this career path is foreman, where one can earn $80,000-89,000/year for supervising miners, meeting quotas, and maintaining an efficient work environment.

    College graduates searching for a job in coal mining can explore careers as geologists or mechanical engineers, depending on their interests. A geologist researches formation dissolution and content of rock layers, and he may also study variation in rock formation and densities. A mechanical engineer, meanwhile, earns $73,000-89,000/year for designing machines and mechanical installations, evaluating machinery, and setting up work control systems.

    From there, an employee can advance to the role of mine manager, which comes with a significant salary increase and additional responsibilities of staffing management, performance evaluation, and promotion of a safe work environment. While a college degree isn’t necessary for a mine manager, only 17% have a high school diploma as their highest degree (for comparison’s sake, 43% hold a Bachelor’s Degree and 27% hold a Master’s Degree).

    Finally, a college graduate’s career in coal mining might culminate as an executive operations manager or mine engineer, both high-level roles earning around $100,000/year. A mine engineer is responsible for planning and designing mines for maximum structural stability, while the executive operations manager leads and managers operation teams.

    A crucial requisite to working in the oil and gas industries is being physically strong. In these career fields, you’re required to 100-150 pounds of equipment regularly. The physical nature of jobs on drilling rigs isn’t for everyone.

    A high school graduate will begin in the oil and gas drilling industries as a hand on an oil drilling rig, conducting inspection on oil drilling equipment, assisting the driller during operations, and ensuring the accuracy of fuel inventories for around $40,000/year. From there, he will advance to a driller, ensuring compliance with all regulating bodies and supervising drilling activities such as core drilling or exploration drilling. Eventually, he may become a tool pusher, supervising daily drilling rig operations

    A college graduate, on the other hand, may enter the oil and gas industries as a petroleum geologist, gaining valuable experience and knowledge in rock formations and mineral samples that could eventually pave the way towards becoming a CEO. The next rung on the ladder is drilling operations manager, managing daily operations and planning various drilling projects, such as exploration drilling, and revising them as necessary. Finally, a drilling operations manager may be promoted to a drilling/petroleum engineer, specializing in the production and placement of wells, earning around $104,000/year according to Salary.com.

    No matter which career path a budding worker in the mining, oil, and gas industries may choose, there’s one thing necessary for career success: autonomy. Being able to work well on your own and being self-directed is key to advancing in your career in the drilling industry.

     



  3. Terramac RT9 – Reinventing The Wheel

    July 7, 2013

    Mike Crimaldi knows track carriers. He was working with crawler-mounted drills before he had a driver’s license, starting out as a driller’s helper at about age 15. As his company’s drilling fleet grew, so did its service and repair capability. Eight years ago he transitioned out of direct drilling services to found Rig Source Inc. in Elburn, Ill.

    As Rig Source’s reputation for customization grew, more and more customers wanted to put crawlers under a variety of equipment that spanned the construction industry. By now Crimaldi has just about seen it all. Speaking from his 35 years of experience, he confidently summed it up: “If you can mount it to a truck, you can put it on tracks.”

    Tracks provide a stable platform that keeps equipment in the field when soil and weather conditions would park truck-mounted equipment. More days in the field means owners move to the next job faster, getting more jobs completed in the same calendar time. For businesses large or small, doing more within the same period of time is the most definitive way to prove increased productivity.

    Tracking the industry

    Though the most common mounts still tend to be flat beds and dumpers, Crimaldi said, “One customer might have a flatbed to mount on a tracked undercarriage, the next a scissor lift. That’s the exciting thing for us, the new uses we keep seeing for it.” He has seen customers use the unit for a mulch blower, mat-carrier, mobile epoxy coating machine, hydro-seeder, mobile crane, tracked welding unit, personnel carrier, water tank carrier, and off-road service vehicle.

    Crimaldi said the roots of the tracked carrier market can probably be traced back to tracked dumpers. Contractors noted how they could be used on soft, wet ground when trucks would either cause too much damage or get stuck. As trucks wore out, owners found they could extend the life and utility of their equipment by remounting it to similar tracked carriers.

    “They would get maybe another five to ten years of use out of their equipment,” Crimaldi said, “but they were also finding that tracks gave them more flexibility for all ground and weather conditions.

    Rain, snow – wet. They can work on their jobsites more days.”

    Tracked carriers were originally designed for off-road use. Using rubber tracks eliminated the need to lay down lumber or matting to protect paved surfaces the rig might have to cross or work from. Advances in rubber track technology have made them highly durable and long lived. “Manufacturers don’t bother much with steel anymore,” Crimaldi said, “since so many customers have gone to rubber.”

    Choosing a carrier

    For customers deciding whether or not to mount certain equipment or which manufacturer to purchase from, Crimaldi defers to Rig Source Director of Sales Matt Slater. Slater’s job is matching customer needs to the right undercarriage. Are there cases where he’d advise against upgrading to tracked equipment? He couldn’t think of any offhand. Rubber track carriers exert as little as 3 psi of pressure on the surface. Just about anywhere a truck or trailer can go, a tracked carrier can go, and more. Though they can’t be driven to and from a worksite from the company’s parking lot, transportation isn’t much of an issue. Slater said, “Most contractors already have a trailer to haul their equipment to the site, so they’re set.”

    The only limitation might be size. Track carriers come in almost any size class imaginable, he said, but the greatest customer demand has been for what he described as “the largest carrier possible without requiring special permitting to transport it.” Trailers with loads 8 feet 6 inches wide or more require oversize permits.

    Demand for this size of rig has been so steady that Rig Source now manufacturers its own rubber track carrier in that class. At 8 feet 5 inches wide, the Terramac RT9 is just under the width restrictions for over-the-road trailers. It’s also the only rubber track carrier in its class made on this continent.

    Slater has nothing against any of the overseas models. “Nothing wrong with them at all. They are well-engineered and we work with all of them. But, you know, many of the parts are proprietary to that manufacturer.” He explained the advantage of a wholly North American made carrier is that parts and service can be found locally throughout the U.S. and Canada.

    Crimaldi agreed: “Take the engine, for example. Most North American customers are more comfortable owning a rig with a Cummins engine because they can get parts and service anywhere.”

    Custom considerations

    How much modification an undercarriage needs in order to accept a given mount is also an issue. Not all manufacturers can be accommodated easily. “We’ve had customers in the past who wanted to use a certain kind of winch on the front or rear of their rubber track carrier. The problem with some models was, they had to literally cut off the carrier’s bumper to be able to mount the winch.”

    When customers order their carrier from Rig Source, however, they give the specifications for what they want mounted up front. Rig Source most often works directly with the original equipment manufacturer to ensure that the bolt pattern of the carrier’s bed will match up perfectly. And if customers need a specific hydraulic pump, they will specify that in the initial order.

    Rig Source typically does just the carrier modification, while the equipment is mounted by the customer or the equipment’s dealer. However, Rig Source does accommodate customers who request mounting as well.

    No pressure decision

    Asked again to think of a scenario for which a tracked undercarriage would be an unwise choice, Slater paused to study the question. He could only think of advantages. Tracked carriers directly contribute to increased productivity, since they extend the company’s on-site calendar. They provide a stable, highly versatile platform that can turn about in place to maneuver equipment precisely where it needs to be. And they do this with significantly less threat of damage to the worksite’s surface. Even fully loaded, the company’s own 22,500-pound Terramac RT9 with its 9-ton load capacity still has a ground pressure of just 4.9 psi.

    When you think about it that way, putting a rubber track carrier under your equipment does exactly what you expect any equipment upgrade to do: reduce the pressure and get you from one job to the next job much quicker.



  4. Coenen appointed marketing manager for Rig Source Inc.

    June 5, 2013

    June 5, 2013 – ELBURN, Ill. – Monica Coenen has been appointed to the position of marketing manager at Rig Source Inc., an international equipment dealer specializing in drilling equipment and crawler carriers. In her new role, Coenen will report directly to Lisa Crimaldi, vice president.

    Coenen has worked in marketing within the manufacturing industry for the past ten years. In her previous position she was responsible for the launch of new products and product development.

    In her new role, she will manage the individual brand development of both Rig Source Inc. and Terramac, the rubber track crawler carrier manufacturer founded by Rig Source in 2011. Coenen said she will work closely with the sales team to implement a consistent brand message through advertising, tradeshows, press announcements, website and social media. Coenen will also spearhead the marketing efforts for Terramac dealer recruitment and create support materials for the dealer network.

    For more information, please contact:

    Monica Coenen
    Marketing Manager
    Rig Source, Inc.
    Telephone: 630-365-1649
    Email: monica@rigsourceinc.com



  5. Rig Source delivers drill rig to Ecuadoran exploration contractor Geosuelos

    February 1, 2013

    Rig Source of Elburn, Ill., has just completed sale and shipping of a Boart Longyear LF70 core drill to Geosuelos based in Ecuador, South America. Geosuelos will use the drill for mineral exploration.

    The LF70 is well-suited for its intended use by Geosuelos, who will be drilling in remote locations. The LF70 is one of the most widely recognized small-format drills in the industry.

    With a total weight of just over 7,500 pounds, the rig can be taken down into seven flyable modules that can be reassembled again on-site in less than an hour. Yet the rig has a 12,000 pound mainline hoist capacity and a pullback capability of 14,137 lbf that supports drilling to a depth of 2,300 feet.

    The LF70 is just one of the new and used core drills Rig Source offers customers, as well as the new Terramac RT9 rubber track carrier.

    For more information, please contact:

    Monica Coenen, Marketing Manager
    Rig Source, Inc.
    Telephone: 630-365-1649
    Email: monica@rigsourceinc.com



  6. Taking Delivery Submission from Rig Source, Inc.

    December 1, 2012

    Kansas-based Terracon, a firm of consulting engineers and scientists with over 130 offices across the U.S., ordered the first CME-55 drill rig ever to be mounted on a Terramac RT9, which is the only North American made rubber track carrier. The CME RT9 combo will now be used in Terracon’s geotechnical, environmental, construction and facilities services provided to clients across the U.S.

    For more information, please contact:

    Monica Coenen, Marketing Director

    Rig Source, Inc.

    Telephone: 630.365.1649

    Email: monica@rigsourceinc.com